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The Millennial Myth: Let's Play

The first wave of Millennials are moving up the ranks at work and influencing, or making, key business decisions. Understanding the impact they're having on today's changing workplace is critical, but the buzz is, they're either lazy narcissists or energized optimists bent on saving the world. So, what's really happening? Older generations pigeonhole millennials with tags like; job hoppers, entitled and social and superficially connected. Millennials see the older generation as obstacles to creating the change they want. By 2020, Millennials will be approximately 50 percent of the US workforce, and by 2030, 75 percent of the global workforce. By sheer numbers alone, they have become the catalyst for accelerated change in the workplace. 

This workshop will debunk some common millennial myths and will expose truths' that apply irrespective of age. Millennials, as digital natives, bring vital value to a work environment in the midst of a digital revolution. But, in many ways, they are a lot like their older colleagues. Come and learn why understanding and embracing this new generation is key to creating work environments where top talent can flourish, across all generations. 

Presenter: Carol Hatton-Holmes

Carol Hatton-Holmes, CFCP, spent the first 20 years of her working life in Corporate America. She held various positions with IBM, SunGard, GTE and Sprint in national account management, human resources and technical services. Currently, she is the Branch Manager at Monarch Staffing in Malvern. Carol actively speaks and writes on generational topics that assist organizations in creating more effective work relationships, improving bottom line results and reducing employee turnover. She volunteers with the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, SCORE, and Wings for Success.  

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Monday 11/05/2018

6:30PM EST

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8:30PM EST


Middletown Free Library
21 N. Pennell Rd.
Lima, PA 19037

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  •   Free
    Unlimited
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